What I also learned from plants:

One thing I struggled with a lot, was what people thought about me. I think I have finally come to terms with the fact that no matter what you do or say, haters are going to hate and that’s ok. That it’s ok to let go of people who aren’t who you thought they were.. or to acknowledge that deep down they are exactly who you knew they were, you just tried to give them the benefit of the doubt. Sometimes it’s better to cut your losses and move on.

@hoyaeverafter

I am glad that I’m not the only “crazy”one, I guess this is just a normal thing to happen.

I am also getting very sick of this coronalife…I want to be back at the dojo all the time and actually doing things. I’ve never had my body feel this out of shape before–however, it was interesting to see all of the subtle and small muscles naginata makes stronger, and see why we take them for granted.

“Budo as a garden”

So I’m sure many of you are wondering why I’m posting so many pictures of plants. Tbh, because the dojo is closed, I don’t have anyone to nurture except for my plants. I also am very limited with what I can do in my house during the stay-at-home order, so yes, plants seem to be the only thing fulfilling my life right now instead of budo, shopping, and nice cafes to work LOL.

However, during my time away from the dojo, I have been able to notice some similarities between plants and #budo (more specifically in regards to #teaching); each plant has its own medium, watering, sunlight, and nutrient requirements in order to thrive well, just like how each individual student has their unique requirements for nurturing, teaching explanations, etc.. in order to perform well. Some plants require more sunlight to grow, some burn, just like how some students need more attention from the teacher, while others need more independence and space because too much individualized attention can make them stressed out. Some plants are naturally more finicky than others, just like how some students are harder to get your point across to than others. Some plant species are easy to grow for some growers, while for some others, it’s considered temperamental and not easy to care for—it honestly sounds just like different teachers exchanging information about their experiences about one particular student at the #dojo . Most importantly, you cannot assume that one type of medium will work for ALL plants; I do not use #leca for my phalaenopsis orchids nor my succulents, however, I use them for my aroids. The equivalent in teaching is to NOT use the SAME explanation of a #waza or concept and expect all students to get it. That’s not how it works. Some students may also need more repetitions than others in order to master a technique, while others, using only your explanation and method, may need less to get it.

I honestly felt like smacking myself in the head that it took me until NOW to fully sink in what #Kliebard (1972) said about the curriculum metaphor, “Curriculum as a Garden.” Kliebard said that when you are developing a curriculum for students, you want to envision a garden where many different species of plants, each with their own specific needs and attributes, and provide a unique, nurturing environment for each plant. No two plants are alike, so with this care, you are able to grow each individual plant to its full potential. This is how students should be viewed when you are teaching. Kliebard also mentioned how gardens can be fun for everyone as well. I can now see his metaphor and also realized how difficult it is for people in competitive #martialarts to be able to nurture others. You definitely cannot be successful without the ability to nurture.

White Plant Notes from neo_plants_flowers

White Anderson

Philodendron White Anderson
Philodendron White Anderson

https://www.instagram.com/p/CBAzb3rA4SR/

– No white on petiolar sheaths (but some exceptions for highly variegated plants)
– Looks like a “White PPP”
– Starts off pink, but hardens to white
– Reds, pinks, whites, greys
– Pointer, heart-shaped leaves
– Red stems
– Has “freckles”/splotches of different colors

White Knight

Philodendron White Knight
Philodendron White Knight

– Red stems, but white petiolar sheaths
– Rounder leaves (think of mochi bunnies)
– Lighter green (in general)

White Princess

Philodendron White Princess
Philodendron White Princess

– Green stems
– Can sometimes come out hot pink o_O but then eases off to white
– Shape of leaves more similar to a PPP (heart-shaped)

White Wizard

Philodendron White Wizard
Philodendron White Wizard

– Green stems
– Fat, round leaves (looks like a White Knight but with green stems)

Apparently there is also a “Philodendron Pink Anderson” but it looks like a specific variegation that’s common on a regular PPP. Bleh, I think it’s bull.

Finding myself again

Recently bought orchids, thinking about buying another rabbit. It’s funny, these were ‘old things’ that I did (also doing it under pressures of being broke), and it’s been a long while. While I have learned new things and I guess have made the new things part of me during the ‘changing process’/losing myself, I guess COVID-19 prevented myself from derailing further and made me find myself again. I feel better, and I think I’ll come back more powerful and knowledgeable than before.

Well, I spoke too soon.

Well, I guess in the plant world, instead of ‘ego’ being the deadly sin within the community, it’s greed.

People are so selfish and immature. I honestly strongly and wholeheartedly disagree with not sharing the name of a seller of a plant. Isn’t the point of plants is to share? Also, I’ve never heard of a single seller who didn’t want their name to go out and get more business…

You post up pictures of your collector’s plant to show off, but then when people ask you for cuttings, you refuse (which is understandable if the plant is too young), but then if they ask for a seller for them to purchase their own stock, you refuse to give the name out?

Sounds like hypocrisy to me.

And that crosses the line for me.

My first thought with this is always, “Didn’t you learn how to share in pre-school?…”

I’ve never heard of anything about how not sharing resources is beneficial to society…

The most bizzare thing is seeing how the Indonesian plant sellers are on Fb; they ‘spy’ on the U.S. market prices and then mark up their plants to the same amount, despite it being dirt cheap over there. I understand the demand, but it sounds greedy to me tbh.

When I was starting to observe this, I began to think about all those dojos that are “recreational” and not about competition as much, and how those dojos attract more of the ‘budo hobbyists’ instead of the serious competitors. It’s interesting, and I guess I see the parallels in THAT aspect.

Perhaps a lot of people who join naginata are kind of like how I am in the plant world, where I’m doing this as a recreational hobby but not making a career out of it. I just am able to stay away from the politics because it’s big enough and I’ve chosen to just keep myself as just, “an individual with plants.” They want to use budo as a getaway from their daily lives–a place to relax.

However, there are some good people and great people you meet (just like in budo).

Hilariously enough, for some reason, fate and karma made me end up in Japan, AGAIN, for plants…

I ended up buying my variegated adansonii from Kunzo

LOL, he reminds me of that Pokemon Breeder from the Pokemon Day Care Center from Red/Blue 😂😂

He’s a master, well-known for that around the world, and doesn’t do it for the money.

I guess a sensei version of Kunzo is a good thing to look forward to becoming 🙂 I think he sets a good role model for the budo community in general.

Siddhartha

So for some reason, I have real good timing with plant investments. Not with the rest of the things in my life, though lol.

I decided to take a risk and just go for this opportunity in getting, “the unicorn plant.” Hopefully, everything will go well and it’ll arrive here ok.

I decided to do a little experiment with investing in both my savings, ROTH IRA, stocks, and plants, just to how the cash flow changes over time within these 4 categories. I also want to see why people, whom choose these particular financial paths, just stick with one path and what benefits they experience with it. I just need to equally match the investment amounts to make it fair. Bleh.

I’ll be with nothing, and I need to go back to my original frugal lifestyle pre-promotion (yeah, I did fall for that “lifestyle inflation” trap), but perhaps I just needed this “reset button” in order to really start over with my finances. I think I’m in a different place than before, and now with quarantine, I can just live super frugally compared to before and see how the finances play out.

Hopefully, my vendor will approve and my unicorn plant will arrive ok. If not, I do have another backup but we’ll see.

The Plant Community

Tbh, I didn’t see what the big deal with plants were–I just awlays liked beautiful, scented flowers, but that’s it. I just knew that they die quickly unless you were growing them in a garden.

But for some reason, I never had trouble with plants. I guess I just always went by that simple lesson being taught in my elementary school science class about how plants, “need water and sunlight.” Nothing else more complicated.

I remember getting my first plant (I think it was a begonia?) during undergrad because Mount Holyoke had this tradition of giving a free mini plant to their freshmen (and apparently there is an urban legend that if your plant dies, you won’t graduate!), and how I was like, “bleh, that’s it?…this is just…a leaf..” and I just left it by the Eastern-facing window and had it grow. Damn, that thing just kept growing, while my roommate’s plant died in a week. I just kept watering it and leaving it there. That’s it.

But I forgot what happened to it lol.

I then remember going to the Netherlands and seeing ppl just buy plants and orchids as if it’s no big deal. I loved the flowers, so I began to get addicted and bought a buttload of orchids from Home Depot and put them in my dorm room during my first year of grad school. Loved it, and was able to keep a consistent watering schedule (that’s the trick!)

I guess I just never grew plants growing up because I lived on a low-floor building in NYC (so all the sunlight would get blocked by the skyscrapers).

Then last year, I saw this ‘pink princess philodendron’ somewhere and I just got hooked. I saw some real cute houseplants in some Nordic interior decoration posts and just started to search there.

One plant led to another plant, which led me to see this whole new world: The Online Plant Community.

I remember when I would post some questions on some orchid forms, a while back, that the people were friendly and actually were nice enough to share info (this is totally the opposite of the budo community, where you have that whole ‘ego thing’ going on and also the tradition of ‘stealing the waza’). I also posted on this monstera albo Facebook group about my first albo that wasn’t getting a new leaf, and had so many nice, thorough responses that helped (I also met one of my albo dealers there, even though I was already following her Insta).

Corona has definitely made me pay more attention to the plants, since I don’t have my dojo and stuff to go to. Upon observing the posts from others and seeing their form of ‘drama,’ I cannot help but to think about how different it is from the budo world.

Mind you, I may have these opinions now because I am still pretty new to it (so everything is still in that lally dally phase), but I did notice a few things:

The plant community doesn’t seem to be competitive in the same way as the budo world, and I think it’s due to the nature of the activity; martial artists are historically always fighting and competing, resulting in having different types of human relations skills, while plant people are used to minding their own activity in nature, and really just quietly introverted.

In the budo world, if you want to learn something, a lot of times you would need to be fake and suck up to the higher-ups, because a lot of people are so egotistical. Unfortunately, it is very common for a lot of backlashing at other teachers about their methods, their students’ faulty techniques, as well as a lot of people happily wanting to teach their, ‘RIGHT WAY AND THE ONLY WAY’ to people because they equate it to them feeding their ego.

I haven’t seen this in the plant world. There are different methods to growing plants, but people are not aggressively pushing their opinions onto others about what the best method is.

Because the supply and demand are always disproportionate, you do not have people aggressively trying to steal customers from some sellers, and they don’t do the same aggressive smacktalking in the same way I see higher up budo ppl do, where they are always trying to poach new talent to add a good rep to their school etc etc…

Now, I’m not saying that all budo people are like this, but unfortunately, there are so many of them that I’m starting think that it’s turned into the mere expectation, which really makes you search hard and treasure those people who actually are good-natured and about the art (those are the people I tend to get along with and the only ppl who tend to like me anyway).

I guess with plants, you’re not fighting—you also are not pushy because you know that you cannot control how the plant grows (lol reminds me of that Kung Fu Panda quote), so ppl who take on that hobby for the long-term tend to fit in that personality profile.

A lot of these thoughts and this current quarantine time-period where I’m spending more time with my plants, reminds me of that scene from Fearless, where Jet Li was out in the mountains and in nature as a way to reform himself:

It’s like being out of that competitive, egotistical environment, actually made him more powerful. As for why that is, I still have no idea 🙂 Maybe I’ll learn after our borders reopen.

I hope that the budo community can learn a lot of things from the online plant community. I hope that they can be friendly with sharing info and more open to making allies, rather than competing to be the best. After all, it’s just like that quote from Hanzawa Naoki,

“The world is made up of human relations”

You cannot get better without others.  Friendships and allies go a long way, so make sure you stay good natured and uncorrupted.

Houseplants

One of the most rewarding (passive) activities to do is houseplant care.

Kinda like budo, you have to learn how to ‘nurture’ and take care of others (it’s something that my wise dorm security guard told me); houseplants are a great way to start to practice that.

I never put a crazy amount of work into plants to keep them alive–I always just remembered from Elementary School how plants essentially need sunlight and water…very simple.

I think a lot of people just forget to do it on a regular, scheduled basis, hence why a lot of plants die. My plants at MoHo always lived and grew super big, while my roommate’s and friends had theirs die…

I first got into plants when I visited the Netherlands (a super agricultural country) in 2012 and saw how many beautiful colors the orchids had—I also saw many of the big windows display them so beautifully. I could only imagine how happy those plants were just bathing in the sunlight 😂.

I grew my own…had like 12 orchids at one point. It was real cool to see them rebloom with my weekly watering and fertilizing schedule. I had them for a while until I had to move outta my dorm and had my friend with good windows take care of them..unfortunately, they had too strong of sunlight and didn’t do the consistent watering schedule…so yeah, they all eventually died 🙁 Even my lovely pink ones…

My current favorite plant is my Pink Princess Philodendron (gee, I wonder why :P). I didn’t think I would ever like a houseplant that didn’t bloom flowers, but since this one had some natural pink…hmm…

Philodendrons, in general, are apparently on NASA’s list of air purifying plants…so I figured that it would be a useful plant that can help kill 2 birds with one stone; provide aesthetically pleasing beauty while being healthy 😛

My coworker then began to teach me the whole way of “propagation”–my god, had no idea that you can basically ‘regenerate’ a lot of plants by breaking off a piece…that was so alien to me, because I always thought that if a flower or leaf was picked from a tree, that it would die because of the lack of nutrients…

Nope, not with a lot of houseplants…especially aroids:

I can essentially grow MORE of this pink beauty and even sell it!!!

It was nice to use up my nice pots that I cannot put soil in…A lot of houseplants habits that Baba did made more sense now. It was cool to see this, and this is a completely new realm that I’m starting to get to know and get used to.

The most amazing thing is seeing the new roots grow on a cutting…it’s sooo fucken cool. I also heard that with this particular plant, that once you make a cutting, the new growths on the original mother plant will have MOAR PINK variegation!!! 🤩🤩🤩

This plant also got very expensive, so I’m hoping that this thing will grow and I can sell this to help pay off for some stuff. They propagate rather easily:

I think because of this coronavirus outbreak and the order of being forced to work at home, I have been less exhausted at the end of the day, resulting in me being able to do my chores and maintenance tasks. The daily commute time, the daily makeup routine, etc.. have now been eliminated, so I can actually have enough energy and time to just properly organize and maintain my plants (oh my god, sooo much time wasted commuting!). NOW I can water my plants on a weekly basis and stuff, which helps keep the plants healthy and growing, resulting in me being able to see the positive changes that occur.

It has also been interesting to see how plants adapt and change when you cut it:

If you have a big, nice window, I recommend you getting a houseplant and watering it on a weekly basis. You can just look at the soil to see if it’s super dry–you’ll know. Or, if the leaves are sad and droopy, that means it’s real dehydrated. It’s a lot of fun to see and it’s also a good way to spend time at home during quarantine, without infecting others outside 😛

I have also began to grow appreciation for other (pink) plants:

My god…those beautiful, aesthetically pleasing Instagram posts are dangerous for shopaholics like moi…

But yeah, now that it’s transitioning to Spring and we are having our days longer, I’ll probably notice some more new growths 🙂

Especially from, my god, my variegated monstera albo borsigiana…jesus christ, that thing seriously needs to grow a new leaf…

But yeah, that’s for another time. I’ll also talk about my semihydroponics journey with houseplants and seeing how much easier it is to take care of healthy houseplants with this new growing medium.

Until then, order some houseplants online so that you don’t need to go outside! You can have them delivered to your door and you can order some cute pots to put them in!

For some beginner houseplants, I recommend the following:

  • Pilea pepperomioides
  • Monstera deliciosa
  • Sweetheart hoya
  • Variegated string of hearts
  • Moonstone succulent
  • Phalaenopsis orchid (make sure you fill your sink with water and have the plant soak in it, so that the water can go from the bottom–>up).

These are all plants that I’ve personally had and grew very quickly. Some of my other favorites have had slow growth, regardless of regular care. I’ll go more into those later.

In any case, have fun! I think any plant, even the difficult ones, are manageable so as long as you put the time and energy into the research and care! The internet has also been the best marketplace to buy any plant you want (don’t go basic and just buy that wtvr basic snake plant from Home Depot…come on now…).